Consolidating sql servers best practices

05-Oct-2018 12:48

First we'll review the benefits of virtual servers, then we'll examine the unique challenges SQL Server presents when you attempt to run it on a virtual machine (VM).We'll explore how Windows Server 2008 Hyper-V is well suited to host SQL Server instances and the intelligent way upcoming SQL Server 2008 R2 takes advantage of a virtual environment.Here are some of the key challenges that, if not properly addressed, may take the shine off your consolidation efforts.By consolidating multiple SQL Server databases onto a single SQL Server the CAL requirement may increase.Gridstore recently conducted a survey of over 125 Enterprise IT professionals a number of detailed questions surrounding the issue of SQL Server consolidation, including the business challenges driving their changes.While cost reduction was the #1 response to what is driving the desire for SQL consolidation, this was tempered by the top three issues concerning respondents when it came to consolidation — Performance (74%), High Availability (51%) and Manageability (40%).A consolidation effort is a complex task that requires information, a detailed plan and timeline for success, and a strategy for administering the consolidated environment.

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IT agility also plays a small but significant role in driving consolidation, stated by 10% of the sample as the key business driver.In the simplest terms, virtualization is the practice of emulating a fully functioning server (known as a of a physical server.The VM (VM) running the guest OS is delivered courtesy of a VM software application and can either be isolated, such as in a test or development environment, or be made available to the rest of the network as an independent server.Consolidation tends to be a high-profile activity that can be politically charged; outages can undermine the entire project.As a result, IT must closely monitor consolidated servers and be proactive about preventing downtime as much as possible. And with those differences come scenarios that impact each consolidation effort.

IT agility also plays a small but significant role in driving consolidation, stated by 10% of the sample as the key business driver.In the simplest terms, virtualization is the practice of emulating a fully functioning server (known as a of a physical server.The VM (VM) running the guest OS is delivered courtesy of a VM software application and can either be isolated, such as in a test or development environment, or be made available to the rest of the network as an independent server.Consolidation tends to be a high-profile activity that can be politically charged; outages can undermine the entire project.As a result, IT must closely monitor consolidated servers and be proactive about preventing downtime as much as possible. And with those differences come scenarios that impact each consolidation effort.I guess the simple question is, would it be better to run multiple instances per machine or 1 instance with multiple databases assuming licensing is not an issue, security and compatibility can be easily grouped and managed (very small user base, very small lightweight databases)? IMHO, depending on the VM capacity (memory, CPU and disk space), you should consolidate databases to one instance.